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Ko-Kutani Kiln Ruins

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Where the Legendary Kilns Were Built

Kutani-yaki (Kutani porcelain) is one of the most refined styles of porcelains in Japan, established during the 17th century under the supervision of MAEDA Toshiharu, the first local lord who governed the Daishoji clan (presently the Kaga City area). GOTO Saijiro, a samurai of the clan, was sent to Arita to learn the techniques for making Arita-yaki (Arita ware) and then built kilns after returning home. The porcelain was named Kutani-yaki after Kutani village where the pottery stone was discovered and the kilns were built. The kilns suddenly disappeared after some 50 years, and the Kutani-yaki that had been manufactured there was later referred to as Ko-Kutani (old Kutani). This is the very place where the Ko-Kutani kilns were built and is now a designated historical site. As of 2021, the roof of the kiln is in the process of being restored to its former state. As of 2021, the roof of the kiln is in the process of being restored to its former state.

Information

Ko-Kutani Kiln Ruins

Access: 35 minutes by car from JR Kaga Onsen Station
Address: 19 Kutanimachi, Yamanakaonsen, Kaga, Ishikawa 922-0136